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After nearly two months of rain, finally I managed to get the paddocks on the estate cut today. As it was so clear and sunny, decided to hitch the Trimax topper onto our vintage 1948 Massey Ferguson to do the job, rather than the more modern New Holland. No air con. cab or power steering on this baby! You do need arms like Arnie to turn this beast! The grass was very long due to the rain, and the old girl struggled a bit, but on a day like today who cares? God...I love my job......sometimes......!

Clear blue sky for a change....look at the length of the grass!

Massey Fergusson

1948 vintage Massey Ferguson (restored) hitched to Trimax topper.

Massey Ferguson 35.

Massey Ferguson 35.

Massey Ferguson 35.

The view from the driving seat....and a gratuitous pic of the OM just to prove it's me driving! 

Massey Ferguson 35.

So...what did you do today?

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I'll try again...the last attempt got wiped out by the 'glitch'...I manage a small (8 acre) estate for a local property developer. This involves looking after all of the grounds, 2 acres of which are formal, and 6 acres of paddocks. I started out in the 70s as an entomologist (insect geek) with ICI when I left school. This was followed by 10 years at the famous engineering firm and compressor makers, Compair Broomwade in the maintenance dept, looking after the lifts, overhead cranes, and foundry machinery. A move to the construction industry found me training as a site chippy, but I soon diversified into joinery and cabinet making. Finally, at the age of 44, I went back to college and retrained as a RHS horticulturalist, and found my present job which I have done for the last 14 years. It allows me to use all the skills I have learned over the last 40 years...today I was cutting grass in the glorious sunshine...tomorrow, I'm going to start the summer clear out of the formal borders...Wed..who knows?...I might get called to site to fit some skirting boards...Thursday might involve a bit of welding...Friday...I could be out on the lake, clearing weed....pretty cool eh? :yes:

Edited by Roger the Dodger
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Long Grass, LONG GRASS?

Surely that's Hay Roger?

Agronomy - - one of the jobs I took the qualifications for and got sidetracked by music from. I can still look at a grass surface and pick out the bents and fescue tho' :lol: even 50 years on!

:weed:

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Believe me, Mel...5" is long for a topping mower...it should really only be about 2" max, or the blades struggle to clear the cuttings from under the canopy. If I'd had more time, I would have crosscut it...ie. mown it again at right angles, but there wasn't time...this was the second of two paddocks, and it took all afternoon to cut them both, once.

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God I hate cutting grass! We've been having a dry spell, so I have not really been arsed to even try lately. I have to avoid sunlight, so that leaves the evening when the bugs are out. :yucky:

Anyway, when I do need to bother, I use this 1984 baby Japanese Ford 1520. It has a 60" Bush-hog on the back. I also have a couple of John Deere residential riding mowers as well as two or three Gravely riding mowers. The smaller stuff always seems to need fuel and/or a battery when I want to use it. :rolleyes:

ford57.jpg

ford58.jpg

Unfortunately, when I do need to cut, there is between 25 and 30 acres to do. :(

Later,

William

Later,

William

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Believe me, Mel...5" is long for a topping mower...it should really only be about 2" max, or the blades struggle to clear the cuttings from under the canopy. If I'd had more time, I would have crosscut it...ie. mown it again at right angles, but there wasn't time...this was the second of two paddocks, and it took all afternoon to cut them both, once.

When we have normal rainfall, in a two to three week period we get three to five foot growth. Though it is true, I spread the wheat, barley and oats the chickens don't finish, everywhere. :lol:

Later,

William

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Nice one Roger, love the tractor.

I was in the UK this week dropping off the kids for their annual summer holiday with the grandparents. My dad helps run a shooting syndicate and they rear 3000 pheasants and 1000 partridge each year. The pheasant pens are all done but on Thursday last week I helped them build the partridge pens. I'm afraid I cant remember the make or model but we were shifting all the panels to and from the pens in this beauty. It's cracking down here but I do miss the English countryside.

dscf9368h.jpg

Andy

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  • 1 month later...

Another beautiful day on the estate, and this time the formal lawns are having their weekly chop. I use a Honda Pro 365 to cut the edges, but the bulk is done with the Allett 24" ride on cylinder mower.

Allett 24 mower.

Allett 24 mower.

There's quite a bit to do!

Allett 24 mower.

This is a Victorian feature, and very rarely seen these days. It's called a 'Ha Ha', and the lawn and paddock beyond seem to be as one, but in reality, there is a 3 foot drop between the two. The idea was to create the illusion of one huge expanse of lawn. In the old days, livestock would have been in the field beyond, and unable to access the garden due to the height difference.

The illusion....

The Ha Ha.

The reality...

Roger's Flora and Fauna album

The angled brackets along the top of the wall support a wire mesh barrier to stop rabbits jumping up on the lawn. (Note to self...strim the base of that wall on Monday!)

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On 31/08/2012 at 23:04, Roger the Dodger said:

Another beautiful day on the estate, and this time the formal lawns are having their weekly chop. I use a Honda Pro 365 to cut the edges, but the bulk is done with the Allett 24" ride on cylinder mower.

Allett 24 mower.

 

All of that flat ground must make a real difference in your mowing experience. I've got hills, rocks and divots all over the place. When I do open up the throttle, it's either terrifying or what I imagine riding on a paint mixer would be like.

By the way, that open reel mower looks rather frightening in its own right. :eek: Does the dead man's switch bar disengage the reel or kill the whole thing?

Later,

William

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On 02/09/2012 at 16:20, William_Wilson said:

By the way, that open reel mower looks rather frightening in its own right. :eek: Does the dead man's switch bar disengage the reel or kill the whole thing?

Later,

William

Will..the Allett is only a couple of years old...we used to have an Atco 24" which had very primitive controls...no safety features at all. This mower has two safety devices... front bar engages the cutting cylinder, and the rear bar engages the rear roller drive for propulsion...let go of either and everything stops. The trailer seat is the one off the old Atco...there was no need to buy a new one, as there was nothing wrong with it. Allett mowers are used for very fine mowing, and are frequently used for sports pitches and golf greens. If the grass gets too long, it has to be topped first with a small tractor and deck...

Ford 14HP Diesel Lawn/garden tractor...

Ford LGT tractor

After I showed the pics of the old Fergie with the Trimax on the back...

Massey Ferguson 35.

...and explained that this mower was for short grass only, we had to dig out the old Wessex rough cutter and put it on the Ford 1920 in order to get the paddocks down to a reasonable length for the Trimax.

Roger's Flora and Fauna album

Ford 1920 and Fergie together.

Massey Ferguson 35.

1920 with log splitter still attached...

Ford 1920 tractor.

As you can see, all our tractors are fitted with grass tyres to prevent tearing up the turf...those rear 1920 ones are nearly 2 feet wide!

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That Wessex deck does resemble the Bush Hog deck. What is its width? I assume it is a tri-blade.

I noticed all of the turf tyres. Where I am, the ground is so hard that when it rains turf tyres just spin. You need chains or tractor tyres. A couple of the intermediate riding mowers have ATV tyres mounted. :lol:

Later,

William

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It's 1.8m (6') and a tri-blade...as with your Bush Hog, the rear gauge wheels can be set for a much higher cut than the Trimax is capable of....I'll get some pics of it attached to the 1920 tomorrow. The problem with the Trimax is it has a full width roller at the front and rear of the deck, for fine finishing and striping.Because of this, it cannot clear the clippings if they are too long because there is nowhere for them to go...you can see the deck is tight to the ground...also, you cannot do sharp turns with it...you have to lift the three point linkage, or risk breaking the side arms...we used to have stabiliser bars fitted, but they snapped fairly quickly!

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Here you go William...this is the Wessex deck on the back of the 1920.

Ford 1920 tractor.

Ford 1920 tractor.

In this pic, you can see that there are only some small anti scalping rollers at the front, and plenty of clearance at the back edge. There is an adjustable flap at the back to prevent to much debris being flung out. Note the height adjusting chains which will only allow the front to drop to a set height.

Ford 1920 tractor.

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  • 4 weeks later...

The grass heap this year has grown to enormous proportions due to all the rain, so as today was a lovely sunny day, got some different machines out and dug a new hole to start filling with grass. I normally have 3 of these pits going at any one time... one filling, one rotting down and one in use...about 8 feet deep by 12 feet wide and 8 feet across. Every week, a trailer load of grass cuttings goes in, followed by a bit of backfill, or bonfire ash. One of these pits takes a year to fill, and will eventually be about 6 feet above ground level, so the depth of compost is about 14 feet. Eventually, in about 3 years time, this will be dug back out and used as compost on the garden, and the pit will be re-used.

Takeuchi mini digger and Thwaites hi tip dumper.

Takeuchi digger.

Hi tip dumper for loading skips.

Thwaites skiploader.

This beats using a shovel!

Takeuchi digger.

Loading the dumper.

Takeuchi digger.

Nearly done...

Takeuchi digger.

 

 

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