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james brodie

Vastly Inflated Prices On Ebay For New Watches

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Have any of you guys noticed sellers on ebay selling 150 quid watches for around £795 or sometimes more??? What's all that about then? A marketing ploy so you buy elsewhere from same seller? It happens frequently....

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I never really understand how anyone can get away with this. Surely if your going to drop £795 on a watch you'd check elsewhere to make sure your getting a good price?

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I never really understand how anyone can get away with this. Surely if your going to drop £795 on a watch you'd check elsewhere to make sure your getting a good price?

As an example, this they have as an rrp of £220 yet selling it for £695.....WHY?....http://www.ebay.co.uk/bhp/seiko-snzf17 Edited by james brodie

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I must admit that I have never purchased anything myself on ebay. Very occasionally, a good friend of mine does the transaction for me but it would only be something really cheap or something I really wanted and couldn't get elsewhere. I generally do not look on ebay but not because of any "snobbery" on my part - it just doesn't occur to me and Kris and I tend to use Amazon instead for general purchases online.

I totally agree with you both that this price rigging is pretty outrageous, and I too don't understand why these sellers do it unless it actually does catch people out. As you say, andrew91, surely prospective purchasers would look around before finally ordering the item from ebay. The awful truth seems to be that there are conmen, and conwomen, in every part of trade and employment, and one just does one's best to avoid them and warn others of their activities.

Edited by Always"watching"

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I see that a lot. Also lots of cheep watches with silly BIN prices I just always stick to my guns when it comes to Max bids I have missed out on lots but all that I win I win at a price in happy with

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they do it because there is always some silly sod who will pay it.

if someone pays £800 for a £150 watch thats down to their own stupidity.

theres no 'price rigging' involved, just 'a' price which you can make the decision or pay or not.

Edited by pugster

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In fairness - they do show the rrp in the detailed description so you would have to be very lazy to get caught out. Maybe just a good way of getting people to look at their offerings? Someone posts on aforum etc and others click to see what it is all about.

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In fairness - they do show the rrp in the detailed description so you would have to be very lazy to get caught out. Maybe just a good way of getting people to look at their offerings? Someone posts on aforum etc and others click to see what it is all about.

I think it's very sad Richy they'd WANT to catch someone out. Genuinely I thought it was a faux pas by either ebay or the seller. I'm a salesman/ sales director, whatever way you dress it up and such a practice is completely unacceptable. Surely ebay have regulators?...

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I think I am with James Brodie on this one. It's a sad world when people just want to rip other people off without a qualm, and it is happening more and more these days, online and outside the computer sales domain.

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In fairness - they do show the rrp in the detailed description so you would have to be very lazy to get caught out. Maybe just a good way of getting people to look at their offerings? Someone posts on aforum etc and others click to see what it is all about.

I think it's very sad Richy they'd WANT to catch someone out. Genuinely I thought it was a faux pas by either ebay or the seller. I'm a salesman/ sales director, whatever way you dress it up and such a practice is completely unacceptable. Surely ebay have regulators?...

RRP is not enforceable in any way, it is up to the prerogative of a seller to price any item at any price they choose.

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as far as i know RRP is just set by the seller , yes its is a sad world we live in when people want to rip other off, tho the world is not a nice place and this has been going on since cave man times when one walked past anothers cave -noticed he was taking a dump and stole the rabbits he had caught earlier.

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Supply and demand, lots of things get sold on second hand at higher than RRP if the supply is limited, buzz light year for example, something is only worth what someone is willing to pay for it, if you buy something at a price you are happy to pay have you been ripped off if you find out you could have got it cheaper? I don't see anything wrong with it.

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I think the point's being missed. For sure if a highly desirable item that's scarce is offered, the inflated price beyond rrp is justified, free market and all that. I'm talking when there is a readily available watch, which is clearly displayed at lower prices on the same ebay page that's scrolled, is vastly hiked. Hence I thought it was some mistake. If it isn't, THAT is unacceptable, hoping someone either doesn't see the other adverts (though not sure how!!) or they accidentally hit buy when card details are already logged (which again seems nigh on impossible). Again, I ask whether a regulator operates for ebay?....

Edited by james brodie

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This may not be true for all, but generally what you are seeing is not meant to be a scam or rip-off. These sellers have long standing ads on Ebay for the same watches. When they have the watches in stock, they change the price to the actual selling price - say £150. When they are out of stock they move the price up to a ridiculous figure. This keeps their Ebay ad live so that they don't have to keep rewriting it when they have stock back in. It's sufficently high that nobody is likely to bid when they are out of stock. When stock is back in they change the price back down to the real asking price. Maybe a bit lazy but not intended to rip people off. That's my understanding from what i have read posted elsewhere. A common practice apparently.

Cheers

Foggy

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I think the point's being missed. For sure if a highly desirable item that's scarce is offered, the inflated price beyond rrp is justified, free market and all that. I'm talking when there is a readily available watch, which is clearly displayed at lower prices on the same ebay page that's scrolled, is vastly hiked. Hence I thought it was some mistake. If it isn't, THAT is unacceptable, hoping someone either doesn't see the other adverts (though not sure how!!) or they accidentally hit buy when card details are already logged (which again seems nigh on impossible). Again, I ask whether a regulator operates for ebay?....

Fairness isn't a major factor in the market. Regulators only care about price fixing, not price setting.

Where trading standards would care about RRP is if the manufacturer was enforcing the RRP via contracts with suppliers (this would be illegal). A case where the distributor/merchant chooses to set their own price is approved and encouraged by the regulators.

That said, where an RRP/pricing is actually displayed on a new item (i.e. via a tag or on the packaging) and the product is sold at a higher price (and there is no justifiable defence such as rarity) the merchant would be in breach of trading standards if he sells it for a higher price (selling for a lower price isn't a problem). This isn't really an issue with watches on eBay as it is easy to remove tags.

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This may not be true for all, but generally what you are seeing is not meant to be a scam or rip-off. These sellers have long standing ads on Ebay for the same watches. When they have the watches in stock, they change the price to the actual selling price - say £150. When they are out of stock they move the price up to a ridiculous figure. This keeps their Ebay ad live so that they don't have to keep rewriting it when they have stock back in. It's sufficently high that nobody is likely to bid when they are out of stock. When stock is back in they change the price back down to the real asking price. Maybe a bit lazy but not intended to rip people off. That's my understanding from what i have read posted elsewhere. A common practice apparently.

Cheers

Foggy

Unorthodox, but this explains it. Honestly never heard of such practice

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That has explained a few weird prices from larger dealers that I thought were listing errors. My rant for today though is about private sellers who state they have no responsibility once items are posted if lost or stolen.

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That has explained a few weird prices from larger dealers that I thought were listing errors. My rant for today though is about private sellers who state they have no responsibility once items are posted if lost or stolen.

Paypal will cover those scenarios and the seller will lose the money whether they think they are responsible or not. :D

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That has explained a few weird prices from larger dealers that I thought were listing errors. My rant for today though is about private sellers who state they have no responsibility once items are posted if lost or stolen.

Paypal will cover those scenarios and the seller will lose the money whether they think they are responsible or not. :D

Yup - happened to me - sold and posted a watch which, allegedly, "never arrived". I refunded the cost in full - there's no other option for a seller.

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That has explained a few weird prices from larger dealers that I thought were listing errors. My rant for today though is about private sellers who state they have no responsibility once items are posted if lost or stolen.

Paypal will cover those scenarios and the seller will lose the money whether they think they are responsible or not. :D

Yup - happened to me - sold and posted a watch which, allegedly, "never arrived". I refunded the cost in full - there's no other option for a seller.

Did you get anyting back from the carrier?

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As a seller I mistrust buyers and as a buyer I mistrust sellers. That being said, have you been to a vet recently, now that is a nice little scam machine.

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I think the point's being missed. For sure if a highly desirable item that's scarce is offered, the inflated price beyond rrp is justified, free market and all that. I'm talking when there is a readily available watch, which is clearly displayed at lower prices on the same ebay page that's scrolled, is vastly hiked. Hence I thought it was some mistake. If it isn't, THAT is unacceptable, hoping someone either doesn't see the other adverts (though not sure how!!) or they accidentally hit buy when card details are already logged (which again seems nigh on impossible). Again, I ask whether a regulator operates for ebay?....

Fairness isn't a major factor in the market. Regulators only care about price fixing, not price setting.

Where trading standards would care about RRP is if the manufacturer was enforcing the RRP via contracts with suppliers (this would be illegal). A case where the distributor/merchant chooses to set their own price is approved and encouraged by the regulators.

That said, where an RRP/pricing is actually displayed on a new item (i.e. via a tag or on the packaging) and the product is sold at a higher price (and there is no justifiable defence such as rarity) the merchant would be in breach of trading standards if he sells it for a higher price (selling for a lower price isn't a problem). This isn't really an issue with watches on eBay as it is easy to remove tags.

Isn't that what Rolex do?

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I think the point's being missed. For sure if a highly desirable item that's scarce is offered, the inflated price beyond rrp is justified, free market and all that. I'm talking when there is a readily available watch, which is clearly displayed at lower prices on the same ebay page that's scrolled, is vastly hiked. Hence I thought it was some mistake. If it isn't, THAT is unacceptable, hoping someone either doesn't see the other adverts (though not sure how!!) or they accidentally hit buy when card details are already logged (which again seems nigh on impossible). Again, I ask whether a regulator operates for ebay?....

Fairness isn't a major factor in the market. Regulators only care about price fixing, not price setting.

Where trading standards would care about RRP is if the manufacturer was enforcing the RRP via contracts with suppliers (this would be illegal). A case where the distributor/merchant chooses to set their own price is approved and encouraged by the regulators.

That said, where an RRP/pricing is actually displayed on a new item (i.e. via a tag or on the packaging) and the product is sold at a higher price (and there is no justifiable defence such as rarity) the merchant would be in breach of trading standards if he sells it for a higher price (selling for a lower price isn't a problem). This isn't really an issue with watches on eBay as it is easy to remove tags.

Isn't that what Rolex do?

Its mostly based on EU legislation and there is a "safe harbour" for companies whose market shares which are below a certain threshold. I suspect Rolex have managed to define the relevant market quite broadly in order to argue that they fall below that threshold. That also provides an interesting reason for why Rolex keep their production low.

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That has explained a few weird prices from larger dealers that I thought were listing errors. My rant for today though is about private sellers who state they have no responsibility once items are posted if lost or stolen.

Paypal will cover those scenarios and the seller will lose the money whether they think they are responsible or not. :D

Yup - happened to me - sold and posted a watch which, allegedly, "never arrived". I refunded the cost in full - there's no other option for a seller.

Did you get anyting back from the carrier?

No.

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