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Always"watching"

When Is A Diver's Watch A True Diver's Watch?

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In addition to minimum water resistance, there are a number of other requirements for a watch to be a certified dive watch. The standards are set by ISO, which works as the basis of most other certification definitions.The standards are reviewed and modified every five years.

Latest ISO 6425 standards :


  • The presence of a time-preselecting device, for example a unidirectional rotating bezel or a digital display. Such a device shall be protected against inadvertent
    rotation or wrong manipulation. If it is a rotating bezel, it shall have a minute scale going up to 60 min. The markings indicating every 5 min shall be clearly indicated. The markings on the dial, if existing, shall be coordinated with those of the preselecting device and shall be clearly visible. If the preselecting device is a digital display, it shall be clearly visible.
  • The presence of clearly distinguishable minute markings on the watch face.
  • Adequate readability/visibility at 25 cm (9.8 in) in total darkness.
  • The presence of an indication that the watch is running in total darkness. This is usually indicated by a running second hand with a luminous tip or tail.
  • Magnetic resistance. This is tested by 3 expositions to a direct current magnetic field of 4,800 A/m. The watch must keep its accuracy to ± 30 seconds/day as measured before the test despite the magnetic field.
  • Shock resistance. This is tested by two shocks (one on the 9 o’clock side, and one to the crystal and perpendicular to the face). The shock is usually delivered by a hard plastic hammer mounted as a pendulum, so as to deliver a measured amount of energy, specifically, a 3 kg hammer with an impact velocity of 4.43 m/s. The change in rate allowed is ± 60 seconds/day.
  • Chemical resistance. This is tested by immersion in a 30 g/l NaCl solution for 24 hours to test its rust resistance. This test water solution has a salinity comparable to normal seawater.
  • Strap/band solidity. This is tested by applying a force of 200 N (45 lbf) to each spring bar (or attaching point) in opposite directions with no damage to the watch or attachment point.
  • The presence of an End Of Life (EOL) indicator on battery powered watches

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IMG_0763.jpg

Mine like quite a lot of people here is a 'Holiday Watch' rather than a 'Dive Watch'.

It gets wet in the sea when attempting to surf, snorkle and messing around in the pool with my daughter.

Also the big hands and good lume make it a must for camping trips.

It has the WR200M rating and the Uni-direction bezel but is not man enough to carry the 'DIVERS' stamp on the dial.

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Actually, let's be honest - any watch with appropriate WR will do as a basic holiday beater, bezel or no bezel.

I chose the Orients because they are cheap and quite attractive.

And if divers or "diver-style" watches float your boat (sic!) then wear them with a suit - why not? For myself I choose not to.

I know several people who love aviator watches and are not pilots.

Lifetime civilians who wear military watches.

Non-petrol heads who wear Heuer Monacos...the list is endless.

Wear what you like and enjoy it. :D

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I use this for work and just used it whilst on holiday in Spain where it remained on all the time both in the pool and sea. Have also dived with it , a great all rounder and one of my cheapest watches probably

bubbles.jpg

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Is there a safety margin built in to the depth rating, for example when our lifting tackle at work is tested a sling might be rated at one ton but the test will use a greater weight. Is this the same for watches, is a hundred meters rated watch actually tested to a greater depth to attain its 100m rating ??

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Is there a safety margin built in to the depth rating, for example when our lifting tackle at work is tested a sling might be rated at one ton but the test will use a greater weight. Is this the same for watches, is a hundred meters rated watch actually tested to a greater depth to attain its 100m rating ??

IIRC the ISO certification allows a tolerance of 10%. So a 600m rated watch will be tested to 660m.

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Screw down crown, double clasp bracelet and at least 200 metres waterproof probably a true diver. But as said, who truly dives like that? One point I never got with the Rolex Submariner: What good is the 'Cyclops' date calendar? It gets knocked by rocks underwater, looks ugly and who's gonna need it under diving circumstances??? Unless you intend to stay under for a week.... :yes:

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Screw down crown, double clasp bracelet and at least 200 metres waterproof probably a true diver. But as said, who truly dives like that? One point I never got with the Rolex Submariner: What good is the 'Cyclops' date calendar? It gets knocked by rocks underwater, looks ugly and who's gonna need it under diving circumstances??? Unless you intend to stay under for a week.... :yes:

The Submariner was designed as tool watch. Something that can be worn daily as well as diving. The original Submariner had no cyclopse or date complication, these came afterwards :)

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Dive? I can even swim!!! but I do like divers/diver style watches and chrono's. Hopefully by the time I get home tomorrow evening our excellent postie will have made a special delivery of my incoming???? more news to follow with pic's :yes:.

:fox:

For "can" read Can't !! :bangin:

Always Watching - Its arrived, see here.

http://www.thewatchforum.co.uk/index.php?showtopic=92274

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Two elastic bands, a plastic bag, wrap arm and wrist in bag with watch on, secure with double twist elastic bands above the wrist and BINGO! Cheap as Chips :lol: :nono: (mind you, it keeps a plaster cast dry :yes: )

For smimming in the pool though, and in the sea as a holidaymaker, I've never had a problem even with cheapie £5.00 quartz/digi junko watches as long as they ain't been bodgered open to fit new batteries and not put back right! I wouldn't trust a vintage watch to keep out the rain, even if they've never been opened? Well, how would you know unless you've owned it since new, but aside, seals may have gone, loose crown, whatever :nono:

Testing with Champagne is a great idea, the bubbles simulate extra pressure :wine:

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Apparently some watches can go nigh on half a mile under water.....yet you shouldn't venture 6 inches into a hot bath! The watches are designed for cold water not warm, so maybe habitually showering and bathing in your diver isn't as safe as you think?...

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Apparently some watches can go nigh on half a mile under water.....yet you shouldn't venture 6 inches into a hot bath! The watches are designed for cold water not warm, so maybe habitually showering and bathing in your diver isn't as safe as you think?...

I suspect that the testing will also include +/- temperatures, I'd be very surprised if it didn't. As for the hot shower or bath another urban myth I've worn my watches in both everyday, sometimes twice or more a day and never had a problem with any of them.

Think of all those waters that people dive in say Egypt or the Middle East that are probably warmer than a bath.

Edited by BondandBigM

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I'm an idiot. I have a stupid psychological need to have watches which can withstand more than a sprinkling of H20, no idea why but that is just the way I am and I become unnecessarily paranoid when wearing watches without 200+m WR and a screw down crown.

Unlike my father I never have been scuba diving nor do I intend to and I always remove my divers before I hit the pool, hot tub, shower or wash my hands... None of my watches have ever come to grief as a result of drowning so it pays to be careful, or maybe not because I have dunked TWO mobile phones in the toilet which could not be resuscitated. :wallbash:

Tony

Edited by TONY M

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