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EJL73

Winding A Maunal Wind Valjoux...

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Hi all,

I just received a lovely new (from the 70s) watch with a Valjoux 7737 manual wind movement. I have never had a manual wind before. Any top tips on how not to break it? ie, which direction should it wind in, how many times should you wind it, etc etc?

Thanks in advance...

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You'll need a grip like a gorilla or to wind it with a pair of pliers to break it , just wind it gently, i use a back and forth movement, until it won't go any further

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There's a lot of nonsense talked about winding, over-winding, etc. My advice - based on conversations with watch repairers and makers is:

1. Wind it until it feels firm and fully wound.

2. Wind it at the same time every day - say in the morning.

3. If it winds fully and then won't go - it's not "overwound" (no such thing) - it's either magnetised or needs a clean. (As Andyclient says).

4. After winding from being completely run down, it should not need a shake to start - if it needs a shake it's either dirty or magnetised.

5. If it starts running very fast - say over 15 minutes a day - then it needs a clean!

6. Minor variations in accuracy per day can be sorted with the regulator.

I wind my 42 watches regularly - and I use a watch winding tool - very useful.

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Thanks both. Very useful. And do both directions wind?

No both directions don't wind but it is just a natural rythm to go back and forth , it only winds in the clockwise direction

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Hi again, one last newbie winder question. When I unscrew the crown to wind, it appears to release the movement and dial which then are free to move within the case (slightly, up & down). I assume this can't be correct? It is an ebay purchase so if this is a fault, I can return...

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Hi again, one last newbie winder question. When I unscrew the crown to wind, it appears to release the movement and dial which then are free to move within the case (slightly, up & down). I assume this can't be correct? It is an ebay purchase so if this is a fault, I can return...

Movement ring could be missing, this could be corrected by a Watchmaker/Repairer

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Hi again, one last newbie winder question. When I unscrew the crown to wind, it appears to release the movement and dial which then are free to move within the case (slightly, up & down). I assume this can't be correct? It is an ebay purchase so if this is a fault, I can return...

It is a fault but nothing serious , I suspect as PC magician says the movement ring could be missing or some valjoux movements use 2 little movement clamps which can sometimes get omitted or lost over the years but can easily be replaced

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Hi all,

I just received a lovely new (from the 70s) watch with a Valjoux 7737 manual wind movement. I have never had a manual wind before. Any top tips on how not to break it? ie, which direction should it wind in, how many times should you wind it, etc etc?

Thanks in advance...

Carefully

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Hi again, one last newbie winder question. When I unscrew the crown to wind, it appears to release the movement and dial which then are free to move within the case (slightly, up & down). I assume this can't be correct? It is an ebay purchase so if this is a fault, I can return...
It is a fault but nothing serious , I suspect as PC magician says the movement ring could be missing or some valjoux movements use 2 little movement clamps which can sometimes get omitted or lost over the years but can easily be replaced

It's going back to the seller. He says he will fix it. Hope he knows what he is doing :stop:

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Hi again, one last newbie winder question. When I unscrew the crown to wind, it appears to release the movement and dial which then are free to move within the case (slightly, up & down). I assume this can't be correct? It is an ebay purchase so if this is a fault, I can return...
It is a fault but nothing serious , I suspect as PC magician says the movement ring could be missing or some valjoux movements use 2 little movement clamps which can sometimes get omitted or lost over the years but can easily be replaced

It's going back to the seller. He says he will fix it. Hope he knows what he is doing :stop:

I hope so to sounds like a nice vintage piece, any chance of a picture ?

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Thats stunning , very nice indeed :yes: I did google valjoux 7737 and it was the memosail that came up , might be worth you having a look, there was even a you tube vid on one , didn't watch it but will now

cheers

Andy

Edited by andyclient

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Funnily enough I've recently been thinking of selling some of my watches on eBay and thought about providing some text with general, basic instructions/guidelines for any potential buyers who may be unfamiliar with vintage watches. Below (still very much a draft) is what I've come up with so far. Perhaps it might be helpful for EJL73 and others new to this hobby. Feel free to point out any glaring errors :)

"Although there are differences between the various makes and types of watch, below are some general guidelines to owning a vintage mechanical watch:

Compared to most modern quartz watches, many vintage mechanical timepieces are delicate, precision instruments, and should be treated as such. Be gentle with them, try not to get them wet (even if they say they are waterproof/water resistant) and have them serviced regularly. Follow these simple steps and there's no reason why a vintage mechanical watch shouldn't continue to provide accurate timekeeping and enjoyable, trouble-free ownership for many more years to come.

Apart from a very well-adjusted Chronometer, do not expect quartz-like accuracy from a vintage mechanical watch. Anything up to +/- one or two minutes per day is common although much better timekeeping can often be achieved.

It may sound obvious but, manual wind watches need to be wound or they will stop! To wind the watch, turn the crown gently in a clockwise direction. When you feel some definite resistance do not try to force the crown around any futher or you'll break it. Once fully wound, a manual wind watch will likely continue to run for two to three days dependng on type. Most people wind their watches every morning or evening also taking the opportunity to set the correct time.

Automatic wind watches also need to be initially wound. This can usually (but not always) be accomplished by turning the crown as described above although, with automatic watches, there is no risk of overwinding them. Generally 30-50 turns of the crown will be enough to fully wind the watch. Once fully wound, the natural movements of your arm whilst wearing the watch causes a small rotor attached to the mechanism inside to spin round and this effectively keeps the watch wound up, usually negating the need to further wind it manually although an occasional "top-up" may be required depending on how active you are! For automatic watches that can't be initially wound via the crown (many Seikos are like this) you will need to wind the watch initially by very gently shaking it for a minute or two to spin up the rotor inside. Once the watch is running, wearing it should be sufficient to keep it wound.

Apart from winding the watch, the crown also provides the means to adjust the time and set the date. For a watch without a date function, gently pull the crown out, away from the case, until it clicks into place. Turning the crown clockwise/anti-clockwise will now move the hands back and forth allowing you to set the correct time. Once the correct time is set, push the crown back in to its orginal position. Some watches have a "hacking" seconds feature where the sweep seconds hand will stop when pulling out the crown to adjust the time. This allows you to set the time precisely to the second.

Setting the date may be accomplished in a number of ways depending on the watch in question. For watches with a "quick set" date function, pulling out the crown as described above allows the date to be changed rather than adjusting the time. Pulling the crown out one notch further to its second notch then allows the hands to be set to adjust the time. Note that you can usually only move the date forwards and not backwards. For watches without a "quick-set" date function, changing the date involves either continuously moving the hands around clockwise past midnight until the correct date is achieved, or, on many watches, winding the hands back and forth past midnight between 8pm and 4am. For watches without a "quick-set" date feature, change the date slowly and gently to avoid causing unnecessary wear and damaging the delicate mechanism."

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Hooray, my watch is being posted back to me tomorrow so I will finally get to wear it. According to the seller;

" The problem was: one of the two mounting screws on the flange was broken. Not possible extraction. Drilling, tapping and setting up a new screw."

That sounds a bit serious but he assured me it has been done properly.

I'll post some pics when it arrives...

Edited by EJL73

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Hooray, my watch is being posted back to me tomorrow so I will finally get to wear it. According to the seller;

" The problem was: one of the two mounting screws on the flange was broken. Not possible extraction. Drilling, tapping and setting up a new screw."

That sounds a bit serious but he assured me it has been done properly.

I'll post some pics when it arrives...

Excellent , sounds like he has done a proper job , good on him , look forward to the pics

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