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Bird Photos


Silver Hawk
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Took the scenic route home from work this morning and there is a pond sort of thing going on. Surprisingly tame but they don't half make a racket I wouldn't like to be in any of the houses that back onto the green.

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Anybody any idea what they are, big ducks, geese  ??

 

Edited by BondandBigM
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They appear to be Canada Geese. Avoid locations where large numbers of them have been. They are honky slippery sh!t factories.

Later,
William

Yep a quick bit of google and it appears that's what they are, I passed again this morning and they were still making a racket.

http://www.rspb.org.uk/discoverandenjoynature/discoverandlearn/birdguide/name/c/canadagoose/

I wonder what they are like cooked. 

:biggrin: 

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They appear to be Canada Geese. Avoid locations where large numbers of them have been. They are honky slippery sh!t factories.

Later,
William

Yep a quick bit of google and it appears that's what they are, I passed again this morning and they were still making a racket.

http://www.rspb.org.uk/discoverandenjoynature/discoverandlearn/birdguide/name/c/canadagoose/

I wonder what they are like cooked. 

:biggrin: 

Apparently good enough to eat. North American hunters shotgun them out of the sky during fall migration.

Later,
William

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I no longer have a decent camera, but over the last few years I've been lucky enough to get a few nice birdy pics.

We had a Blackbird at work that got so tame you only had to whistle and he'd come down for some sultanas.

A Robin that wanted to serve the customers.

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A Yellowhammer that came for a walk with me very early one morning.

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A baby long tailed Tit

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A Whitethroat

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A Wren singing it's head off.

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Unfortunately,our eldest daughter volunteering at the local cat rescue center resulted in us now having four killing machines so we no longer have so many visitors in the garden, but last year I found that a few extra birds were attracted to my feeder if I put a bread roll on the top of my feeder. I really can't understand why my wife got upset about that . :laugh:

 

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I'm a keen photographer and birds was one of my main interests.  I don't get as much time for it since retiring, strange as it may sound.  Here are a few images.

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Spotted flycatcher

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Laughing dove

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Rufous tailed bush robin

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Water pipit

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Siberian stonechat

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Desert wheatear

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Collared pratincole

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"In 2001, peregrines bred in central London for the first time at Battersea power Station. The derelict building provided an ideal nesting location but was to undergo a major development.

In 2003, WCP were commissioned to prepare a strategy which would remove any ecological restraint that the resident peregrines might propose to future works. This was designed to ensure the well-being of the birds during the period of works and maintain their continued presence as a breeding species on site. This was achieved by the designing of a permanent nest facility which could be incorporated into the new architecture.

WCP, together with their clients, subsequently commissioned the installation of a 40 m box-section tower topped by a large nest box. This proved to be the first custom designed tower installed and successfully used by breeding peregrines in the UK"

http://www.urbanperegrines.co.uk/consultancy/wildlife-conservation-partnership/case-studies/battersea-power-station/

They were found living in one of the famous chimney stacks of the power station.  Unfortunately, the chimney stacks weren't safe and had to be deconstructed and are being rebuilt as part of the planning permission for the development (a fascinating process in itself).  Anyway, was lucky enough to see one coming into land on their new protected nest (no one but the organisation responsible for caring for the birds are allowed anywhere near the tower) but it was a murky day, I only had my point and shoot and they don't really like you taking pictures on site.

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http://www.standard.co.uk/news/london/elton-johns-battersea-power-station-bash-fell-prey-to-falcons-9513020.html

:thumbsup:

http://www.standard.co.uk/news/birds-paradise-in-battersea-7228408.html

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A Parakeet feeding on my neighbour's peach tree.

Not the greatest photographs I know, but they're the best I could do under the circumstances.  These guys generally fly very high and very fast and aren't often seen close to the ground so photo opportunities are rare.

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There are huge flocks of these all over South London.  I'd be interested to know if people see them in other parts of the country too.

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They're noisy blighters.  A few of Krispy's Peregrines would be useful around here I think :whistle:

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Oh, and if I look out of the other side of the house, I can see a flock of Canada Geese!  What a crazy mixed up world :laugh:

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On 8/28/2016 at 18:58, rhaythorne said:

A Parakeet feeding on my neighbour's peach tree.

Not the greatest photographs I know, but they're the best I could do under the circumstances.  These guys generally fly very high and very fast and aren't often seen close to the ground so photo opportunities are rare.

parakeet1.jpg

 

There are huge flocks of these all over South London.  I'd be interested to know if people see them in other parts of the country too.

parakeet2.jpg

 

They're noisy blighters.  A few of Krispy's Peregrines would be useful around here I think :whistle:

parakeet3.jpg

 

Oh, and if I look out of the other side of the house, I can see a flock of Canada Geese!  What a crazy mixed up world :laugh:

We see them a lot in Berkshire...you usually hear them before you see them as there's no mistaking their distinctive 'chittering' squawking as they fly. 

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A couple of days ago, we were removing strangulating honeysuckle from a whitebeam tree.  We knew there was an old nest in the tree and there hadn't been any activity for months that we could see and it was too high to double check. How wrong were we :(.  With all the tugging on the honeysuckle, we managed to dislodge these two from the nest:

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First response was "Oh no!", second response was "They are huge, what are they?" and third response was "God, they're ugly!".  After a bit of Googling, it turns out that they are Wood Pigeon chicks and from what we've read, it seems Wood Pigeons are good parents and won't give up on their chicks easily....

As there was no chance of getting these chicks back into their broken / destroyed nest, and it was getting dark, we put them in shoe box and strapped it to the trellis under the tree they fell from.  Next morning, a parent was feeding them :thumbsup::

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Two days later, chicks seem to be doing well but not the shoe box which is now full of sh*t and sagging somewhat with the weight of the chicks and parents.  Any rain and it would turn to mush, so time to move them again. This time into a metal fruit bowl that has holes; built them a nest from twigs etc and they seem happy in it (very feisty during the move with lots of pecking of hands --- ungrateful things!).  We also put the bowl higher into the tree,  Again, the parents have found them and are feeding them.

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Not sure how this is going to end.  They don't have a lot of cover although we have tried to shield them from the sun and predators.  So far so good......

Edited by Silver Hawk
typos
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