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PVD on watches.......


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Attention to detail is relevant in any form of plaiting, IMO. Saving money or cheating by saying a watch case is plaited says little unless you back up the "thickness" of the plaiting. My or

The way PVD was explained to me was this, consider the unpolished metal as having,  at a microscopic level, a surface like the exterior of a bath sponge. Electroplating simply coats the exposed surfac

Google seems to be his friend. Adversarial seems to be the intent.  I suspect most have grasped the demeanour? Long ago.

I'm personally not keen on PVD coating as it marks / scratches easier than steel, doesn't look good when it does, and can't really be re-finished. Brand new they look great and if you look after your watch and don't scuff it then great but I'm definately going to chip or scratch the coating at some point.

I do have 1 PVD coated watch, a Smith and Wesson one with tritium dials I wear at night. I got it at a good price so wan't too fussy if I marked it but so far I haven't

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I'm not sure about the MWC, but the Seiko isn't PVD.

Physical Vapour Deposition is a complex and expensive process where the coating is bonded to the base metal.  Seiko use Ion plating which is as much use as a chocolate fireguard - the plating rubs off with standard wear, and any knocks or abrasions and it scrubs right off.

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PVD coating is extremely tough and difficult to damage significantly (in my experience).

A lot of people mistake a black coated watch for PVD.  I have a few cheaper black Seiko models and love the look of them, but rarely wear them for fear of damaging the plate.

Edited by kevkojak
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2 minutes ago, kevkojak said:

PVD coating is extremely tough and difficult to damage significantly (in my experience).

A lot of people mistake a black coated watch for PVD.  I have a few black models and love the look of them, but rarely wear them for fear of damaging the plate.

I'm always suspicious of any plaiting unless I know what it is and how dense.:wink:

Five microns is asking for trouble, IMHHO.:biggrin:

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i think with PVD there is a difference between damage and wear, worn pvd is a good look IMO with all the high points worn through and stainless steel shining through, but scrapes and scratches look terrible

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4 minutes ago, RWP said:

Ahhhhhhh.......Ok KevKojak,............this is PVD...........Good thing the seiko lives in a drawer.....unless Tissot tells fibs....

 

23725646803_af4903f1ae_b.jpg

 

Rose gold AND carbon PVD if memory serves, and a good looker too.    :notworthy:

That should last years without showing any wear, in theory the case should wear like solid gold - the plating is blasted into, and bonded to, the steel.

If you were to wear that and the Seiko in day-on, day-off rotation for 12 months the Tissot would look like it does in the pic above and the Seiko would be goosed with steel showing through on all the sharp edges. I absolutely love the Neo-Sport line, but finding them in good condition second hand is very difficult, I wish I'd bought a full set when Creation were knocking them out at £80!!!     :laugh:

6 minutes ago, Bruce said:

i think with PVD there is a difference between damage and wear, worn pvd is a good look IMO with all the high points worn through and stainless steel shining through, but scrapes and scratches look terrible

Meh, easy to hide... I had an old Porsche Design watch in PVD which I was forever dinking. It had more permanent marker dabs on it than PVD when I finally sold it!  :biggrin:

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Attention to detail is relevant in any form of plaiting, IMO.

Saving money or cheating by saying a watch case is plaited says little unless you back up the "thickness" of the plaiting.

My original Hamilton Trent, which is "Gold Filled" shows signs of tarnish when unworn, not a solid Gold watch (of course) but a properly plaited one, at least.:)

HTrent2.jpg

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5 minutes ago, Stan said:

Attention to detail is relevant in any form of plaiting, IMO.

Saving money or cheating by saying a watch case is plaited says little unless you back up the "thickness" of the plaiting.

My original Hamilton Trent, which is "Gold Filled" shows signs of tarnish when unworn, not a solid Gold watch (of course) but a properly plaited one, at least.:)

HTrent2.jpg

Back when standard plating densities were at least 20 microns and ranged as high as 80 microns for "Heavy Gold Plating" ... nice Hamilton!! :thumbsup:

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There's a bit of misconception about coatings and surface hardening. There are a lot of "Trade Names" for what can be basically a similar process. 

A couple of links all be it to industrial applications to give you an a bit of an overview 

:)

http://www.ionbond.com/en/

https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ionic_bonding

http://www.bodycote.com/

http://www.bodycote.com/en/services/surface-technology.aspx

 

 

 

 

 

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12 minutes ago, PDXWatchCollector said:

Back when standard plating densities were at least 20 microns and ranged as high as 80 microns for "Heavy Gold Plating" ... nice Hamilton!! :thumbsup:

I love the Hamilton Trent, it contains a very fine movement.

It doesn't look too shabby either, with it's Stirling Silver Quadratic dial.  :wink:

Thank you for recognising it as a handsome, well made watch, by a fine company now in the hands of "some other" company.:wink:

 

Edited by Stan
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stainless only with a nice balance between polished and brushed surfaces. I've seen lots of very nice black watches, but can't abide them when I wear one, and the slightest mark or chip would send the watch to the sales section.

Edited by SBryantgb
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The way PVD was explained to me was this, consider the unpolished metal as having,  at a microscopic level, a surface like the exterior of a bath sponge. Electroplating simply coats the exposed surface; PVD fuses with the steel base and the "holes" in the sponge are filled with the deposition, so even when the surface coating wears away the "pores" are still full of the colored coating material and the color will just look duller on the worn parts. I know that will be laughed at by chemically enlightened people, but it kind of made sense to me.   PVD? Don't have any, but I like it, this is my favourite PVD watch...

 

style-blogs-the-gq-eye-autodromo-prototi

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4 minutes ago, Thimo said:

The way PVD was explained to me was this, consider the unpolished metal as having,  at a microscopic level, a surface like the exterior of a bath sponge. Electroplating simply coats the exposed surface; PVD fuses with the steel base and the "holes" in the sponge are filled with the deposition, so even when the surface coating wears away the "pores" are still full of the colored coating material and the color will just look duller on the worn parts. I know that will be laughed at by chemically enlightened people, but it kind of made sense to me.   PVD? Don't have any, but I like it, this is my favourite PVD watch...

 

 

I have read that as well and believe it to be true. The problem lies in the fact they are talking about things on a molecular level. Persistent long term wear and tear will scrape the thin coating off as well as the outer surface of the metal. You can see how deep a gouge can be on a relatively hard stainless case, so PVD doesn't really stand a chance. PVD's adhesion is the selling point, not durability.

Later,
William

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